Your Connection To the Outdoors

Conservation

Pertaining in some way to conservation efforts or issues.

White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

Help Save the LWCF

One lesson that the nation has learned during the global pandemic, is how important nature and the outdoors are for our health; both mentally and physically. With a growing appreciation for the environment and an increase of the public enjoying open spaces, comes a greater responsibility to conserve and protect our land and the wildlife that thrives upon it. 

Volunteer-led Activities to Resume after June 22nd

Although the COVID 19 pandemic is by no means over, AMC and the Berkshire Chapter are applying careful evidence-based risk management practices to chart a path forward for volunteer-led outdoor activities to resume safely. 

On June 22 we will begin offering volunteer-led activities in small groups employing social distancing measures. Group size will be capped at ten (10) participants including leaders. Activity leaders are receiving training on new trip safety protocols and procedures. 

Senate Passes Land and Water Conservation Legislation

On February 12th, the United States Senate voted 92 to 8 to pass legislation that included permanent authorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund ( LWCF). The LWCF, which is supported by a share of the income the federal government receives from off-shore oil and other leases, is the principal source of federal funds for land acquisition for parks and reserves as well as  for recreational developments.

Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) and Clean Power Plan Initiatives

Conservation is one of three important pillars at the AMC, next to recreation and education. The AMC is involved in a number of conservation initiatives from DC to Maine. Two pressing conservation initiatives for the AMC involve land conservation and clean air. Read more about these issues below and find out how you can get involved.

Warner Pond

Warner Pond, just a few yards off Route 47 and bordered by Warner Hill and North Hadley farmlands, was a relaxing two-plus hour paddle last Saturday under a sun and puffy cloud blue sky. Swans with their cygnets, painted turtles, and a maze of blossoming Pond and Swamp Dock Lilies greeted us as we slowly meandered past a shoreline teaming with the signs and sounds of plant and animal life.

Soak up the Rain; Be Part of the Solution

Join your neighbors around New England who are taking action to soak up the rain. They're planting trees, rain gardens and green roofs; disconnecting and redirecting their downspouts; using rain barrels and drywells; and replacing their driveways and parking lots with permeable pavement. They're helping to soak up the rain and reduce the polluted runoff that flows to our streams, lakes, rivers and coastlines.

You can help soak up the rain.

Soak up the rain to help:

Plant a Chestnut Orchard!

As you may know, the American Chestnut tree used to be a prolific provider of nourishment over the winter months, and the tree was found all over the Eastern seaboard. However, in 1904 a bark blight was introduced from Asia, which spread and destroyed almost all the trees. Now, once the tree grows enough to develop bark, the fungus girdles and topples it. The tree still lives with sprouts coming from around the trunk. For many years, dedicated organizations have been trying to breed blight-resistant trees.

Wildlife Tracking Workshop at Noble View postponed to 3/16

There are always amazing things happening in the outdoors, and all of them leave stories. Tracking is fun way to learn: it puts the QUEST back into question and the SEARCH back into research. Engage all the senses: touching the tracks, listening to birds and other woodland residents, and examining markings left behind on trees. Come hike with us as we gain a deeper understanding of the forest in winter and discover who is out and about at Noble View. Snowshoes required.